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KEYLESS ENTRY VULNERABILITY: THATCHAM RESEARCH OFFERS GUIDANCE TO CONCERNED DRIVERS

Spate of vehicle thefts exploiting keyless entry systems continue
Security advice provided to drivers with keyless entry systems

Following further news coverage of CCTV footage capturing the theft of a car with apparent ease, vehicle security experts Thatcham Research are today offering guidance to worried drivers.

The ‘transmitter relay’ attack seen in the footage exploits a vulnerability in a vehicle’s keyless entry system, with criminals amplifying or capturing the signal from a keyless or ‘smart’ fob.

Keyless fobs, which should not be confused with standard remote fobs, allow drivers to easily open and start their vehicle without pressing the fob or even having to remove it from their pocket.

Richard Billyeald, Chief Technical Officer at Thatcham Research comments, “Keyless entry systems on cars offer convenience to drivers, but can in some situations be exploited by criminals. Concerned drivers should contact their dealer for information and guidance, and follow our simple security steps.”

“We are working closely with the Police and vehicle manufacturers to address this vulnerability, continuing our approach that has driven vehicle crime down 80% from its peak in 1992.”

Following further news coverage of CCTV footage capturing the theft of a car with apparent ease, vehicle security experts Thatcham Research are today offering guidance to worried drivers.

The ‘transmitter relay’ attack seen in the footage exploits a vulnerability in a vehicle’s keyless entry system, with criminals amplifying or capturing the signal from a keyless or ‘smart’ fob.

Keyless fobs, which should not be confused with standard remote fobs, allow drivers to easily open and start their vehicle without pressing the fob or even having to remove it from their pocket.

Richard Billyeald, Chief Technical Officer at Thatcham Research comments, “Keyless entry systems on cars offer convenience to drivers, but can in some situations be exploited by criminals. Concerned drivers should contact their dealer for information and guidance, and follow our simple security steps.”

“We are working closely with the Police and vehicle manufacturers to address this vulnerability, continuing our approach that has driven vehicle crime down 80% from its peak in 1992.”

Vehicle Theft Data

Recent ONS data states that 91,000 vehicles were stolen in 2016, up from 70,000 in 2013. However, this data relates to all vehicles, including mopeds, motorbikes and vans. Car crime peaked in 1992, a year which saw 620,000 thefts.

Figures revealing the exact number of cars which have been compromised using the transmitter relay attack are not available, due to the way vehicle thefts are recorded.

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Posted on 27th November 2017 at 5:34 PM

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